Hand-Printed Valentines, Now with Extra Lasers


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I've been chatting with people for months about how easy it would be to use the lasercutters to make printmaking plates. Last week, I figured I'd put my Europop references where my mouth is. From a printmaking perspective, these are a little rough around the edges, but we're zeroing in on the best practices for making a really reliable plate. (Printmaking 101: Don't assume things that are supposed to be flat are actually flat.)

I forgot to flip the text the first time I made these plates. So much for my fancy printmaking education!

I forgot to flip the text the first time I made these plates. So much for my fancy printmaking education!

A plate like this is super easy to make. You just cut out everything that you want to print, and a back plate to adhere them to. You can etch or mark the back plate to help you align your pieces, or freehand it. Just remember-- if you're printing text, the cut-out pieces need to be reversed for it to print straight. After that, glue them down in a way that keeps them as flat as possible. Hot glue is a hot mess; wood glue takes a while to really dry but is the best long-term plan. 

Interested in learning more? I'm teaching an Inkscape class on 2/4 (7pm, $50) on the basics of preparing a file for the lasers, and I'll be going over how to prepare a plate like this. 

Or if you really just want the hands-on part, I'm teaching a valentines-printing workshop on 2/11 (7pm, $60, all materials included). I'll guide you through designing, assembling, and printing the plate. If you have paper or cards you really want to bring and print on, feel free; otherwise I will supply enough for five of your sweetest sweet-hearts.