Viewing entries tagged
electronics

Sunday night in the Advanced Circuits Lab

 
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What can you build with our Advanced Circuits Lab?  How about simple USB programmable electronics?   Morgan Redfield created this 3.3V basic trinket board on Upverter.  It's based off of the Adafruit Trinket It is 2 layers, with 5 wire vias.   It takes a little over 2 minutes on the Protolaser.  It's a pretty good start for any basic attiny85 project.

Basic Trinket - LV2 by motred 5d1d1e7d31a8d7a2 - Upverter

On one of our small panels, I can get 3 boards.  They look OK, but they don't really show off the laser.  

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It was a really slow Sunday what with Seahawks in the SuperBowl and all, so I thought I'd fork Morgan's design to give myself something to do.  Idle hands...

Octotrinket by mattw d63764ca4c58f0b5 - Upverter

I didn't have any real project in mind for this board, so I just picked fun features as I went along.

I decided I should make the board smaller, smaller is always better. Pad only USB A plugs are cool.  I also perforated it in case I wanted to get rid of it once it is programmed.

Adding a battery also seemed like a good idea.  We have 2032 snaps, and this gives it some versatility if I come up with a project that requires it on the next rev.

Through hole headers didn't make sense to me. This isn't going on a breadboard any time soon, so I just made pads go to the edge and turned off the holes in my CAM step.  Totally lazy, but it really is a one off, and I didn't feel like taking more than an hour to work on it.  

I really enjoy the zen of routing single sided boards, so I used a couple of 1206 zero ohm resistors and ran 6 mil traces. 

The battery on the back stopped me from dropping vias altogether, so I made them 1mm drills and avoided a toolchange on the PCB plotter.

PCB View of Octotrinket

PCB View of Octotrinket

Building the board went pretty fast.  a little under 2 minutes per board (both sides), and only 1 toolchange on the plotter.

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Assembly, because it's all SMT also went quickly.  Syringe on paste and place the components. A little bit of quiet time in the solder room.  It took an hour to paste and place all 4 boards on the panel.

After paste, I dropped the boards in the reflow oven on wave 2, and it was done in about 7 minutes.  I used paste and the Metcal pencil on the wire vias and the back snap.

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Assembled boards,  They need testing, but all in all not bad for 4 hours on a lazy Sunday.  

It works!

Thanks to Gabe for his awesome breadboarding!   

Remember kids, too many amps make smoke!

Our first Using Transistors workshop went well today. We managed to continue the tradition of blowing up at least one component per class. This time it was a transistor that shattered due to excessive current. As usual, the exploding component served to highlight the facts covered in the class. The workshop attendees got to play with logic gates, switches, sensors, and motors. Interest in both of our electronics workshops has remained strong. The Intro to Electronics workshop on Thursday has been full for a few weeks, and we already have people on the waiting list for our next classes. Next month we’ll be having another set of electronics workshops, so register early to reserve your spot. We haven’t forgotten about those of you who want a soldering workshop. We’re hard at work designing a workshop that’s worthy of you. As soon as we’ve got a curriculum we’re satisfied with, we’ll start scheduling the soldering workshops.  Introduction to Electronics Sunday, February 7 2010 2-4:30 Cost: $40 This workshop covers everything you need to know to get started in electronics. We’ll start from the basics of electricity and work our way up to using integrated circuits. You’ll leave the class with some simple components and the knowledge to use them. Using Transistors Sunday, February 21 2010 2-4:30 Cost: $40 We’ll explore transistors, what they’re used for, and how to use them. After an overview of the function of transistors, we’ll spend the class making some simple switches, logic gates, and an amplifier. Required Equipment: Breadboard, Multimeter

Our first Using Transistors workshop went well today. We managed to
continue the tradition of blowing up at least one component per class.
This time it was a transistor that shattered due to excessive current.
As usual, the exploding component served to highlight the facts
covered in the class. The workshop attendees got to play with logic
gates, switches, sensors, and motors.

Interest in both of our electronics workshops has remained strong. The
Intro to Electronics workshop on Thursday has been full for a few
weeks, and we already have people on the waiting list for our next
classes. Next month we’ll be having another set of electronics
workshops, so register early to reserve your spot.

We haven’t forgotten about those of you who want a soldering workshop.
We’re hard at work designing a workshop that’s worthy of you. As soon
as we’ve got a curriculum we’re satisfied with, we’ll start scheduling
the soldering workshops. 

Introduction to Electronics
Sunday, February 7 2010
2-4:30
Cost: $40

This workshop covers everything you need to know to get started in
electronics. We’ll start from the basics of electricity and work our
way up to using integrated circuits. You’ll leave the class with some
simple components and the knowledge to use them.

Using Transistors
Sunday, February 21 2010
2-4:30
Cost: $40

We’ll explore transistors, what they’re used for, and how to use them.
After an overview of the function of transistors, we’ll spend the
class making some simple switches, logic gates, and an amplifier.

Required Equipment:
Breadboard, Multimeter

If you’ve been around the shop lately, you’ve probably heard us mention that we’re going to build Johnathan Wards’ MTM PCB Mill.   We’ve been making good progress. We don’t have a shopbot, and our first attempt at getting some parts made on a neighbor’s CNC didn’t work out, so we lasercut our assembly out of 6mm plywood and did a bit of glue work to get a nice solid frame.  This not only looks nice, it gives us a lot more control over how we can build the thing.  Turns out the first failure was a good thing because other than the initial body,  our mill isn’t going to be very much like the original at all.   Which is of course the point of Open Source Hardware.   It’s not really a blueprint, it’s a starting point. We’ve been really interested in is seeing if we could build the mill without going through the MTM BOM.   Sure, it’s reasonable pricing if you’re looking at CNC mills, but buying 108 bucks worth of Frelon lined linear bearings when we already have a bunch of tools that make tools seems silly. We can make linear bearings. We have a makerbot and a spool of HDPE (slippery plastic for the uninitiated).  Add to that we have printer rods in the Junk Box, extra threaded rod from our second makerbot build, stepper motors, drivers, arduinos, DC motors, and pounds upon pounds of screws and nuts.  We started looking around the shop and figured out we can make this thing with stuff we have laying around.  Once it’s built, we can use it to make itself better too! Tonight was all about hacksaws and printing with HDPE for the first time.  It was a bit of effort, but we got all our rods cut and built an X axis that slides pretty smooth. We also got some ideas for the next round of cuts, which we should be able to fit in the scrap from the first round.   We’ll keep you updated on our progress, and publish our plans so you can make what we do, and change what you want. Once it’s done, we’re going to put this robot to work.  Come in and make surface mount PCBs in a little under an hour. If you’re wondering how to make boards (we sure are), we’ve started up a wiki page on the toolchain that the Center for Bits and Atoms uses.   It’s pretty cool stuff.

If you’ve been around the shop lately, you’ve probably heard us mention that we’re going to build Johnathan Wards’ MTM PCB Mill.   We’ve been making good progress.

frame

We don’t have a shopbot, and our first attempt at getting some parts made on a neighbor’s CNC didn’t work out, so we lasercut our assembly out of 6mm plywood and did a bit of glue work to get a nice solid frame.  This not only looks nice, it gives us a lot more control over how we can build the thing.  Turns out the first failure was a good thing because other than the initial body,  our mill isn’t going to be very much like the original at all.   Which is of course the point of Open Source Hardware.   It’s not really a blueprint, it’s a starting point.

makerbotting bearingsWe’ve been really interested in is seeing if we could build the mill without going through the MTM BOM.   Sure, it’s reasonable pricing if you’re looking at CNC mills, but buying 108 bucks worth of Frelon lined linear bearings when we already have a bunch of tools that make tools seems silly. We can make linear bearings. We have a makerbot and a spool of HDPE (slippery plastic for the uninitiated).  Add to that we have printer rods in the Junk Box, extra threaded rod from our second makerbot build, stepper motors, drivers, arduinos, DC motors, and pounds upon pounds of screws and nuts.  We started looking around the shop and figured out we can make this thing with stuff we have laying around.  Once it’s built, we can use it to make itself better too!

Tonight was all about hacksaws and printing with HDPE for the first time.  It was a bit of effort, but we got all our rods cut and built an X axis that slides pretty smooth. We also got some ideas for the next round of cuts, which we should be able to fit in the scrap from the first round.   We’ll keep you updated on our progress, and publish our plans so you can make what we do, and change what you want.

Once it’s done, we’re going to put this robot to work.  Come in and make surface mount PCBs in a little under an hour.

If you’re wondering how to make boards (we sure are), we’ve started up a wiki page on the toolchain that the Center for Bits and Atoms uses.   It’s pretty cool stuff.

Normally the vending machine is a random grab, but since it’s the holiday season and we’re big fans of both awesome and cheap,  it’s probably worth noting these two new $10 additions. The Bliplace Kit and the sack-o-duino. You may have seen the Bliplace on hackaday a while back, it’s Tanjent’s awesome wearable sound activated toy, but the sack-o-duino is something we cooked up here.  We couldn’t find any breadboard compatible arduinos for $10, so we came up with this. A bag of parts, ready to drop into a bread/proto board that will give you pre-flashed arduino on the cheap. Included in the bag is: ATMEGA 168 with arduino bootloader 10K resistor 16Mhz ceramic resonator 5V voltage regulator Green high intensity LED w/resistor 6 pin Header and 100 nF capacitor for your FTDI cable

Normally the vending machine is a random grab, but since it’s the holiday season and we’re big fans of both awesome and cheap,  it’s probably worth noting these two new $10 additions.

The Bliplace Kit and the sack-o-duino.

You may have seen the Bliplace on hackaday a while back, it’s Tanjent’s awesome wearable sound activated toy, but the sack-o-duino is something we cooked up here.  We couldn’t find any breadboard compatible arduinos for $10, so we came up with this. A bag of parts, ready to drop into a bread/proto board that will give you pre-flashed arduino on the cheap.

Included in the bag is:

  • ATMEGA 168 with arduino bootloader
  • 10K resistor
  • 16Mhz ceramic resonator
  • 5V voltage regulator
  • Green high intensity LED w/resistor
  • 6 pin Header and 100 nF capacitor for your FTDI cable

Metrix Create:Space will be holding its first workshop on Sunday, November 15th, 2-4PM Introduction to Electronics Ever wondered how your T.V. or computer works? How about your cell phone. Come find out the basics behind these complicated devices at our Introduction to Electronics workshop. You’ll learn what current and voltage really are, how to read a circuit diagram, and how to put together your own small projects using discrete and integrated components. $40 includes instructor and all parts and equipment. Space is limited, sign up now!

Metrix Create:Space will be holding its first workshop on Sunday, November 15th, 2-4PM

Introduction to Electronics

Ever wondered how your T.V. or computer works? How about your cell phone. Come find out the basics behind these complicated devices at our Introduction to Electronics workshop. You’ll learn what current and voltage really are, how to read a circuit diagram, and how to put together your own small projects using discrete and integrated components.

$40 includes instructor and all parts and equipment.

Space is limited, sign up now!