Viewing entries tagged
robots

A is for Apples and Art and Awesomes.

panoptos

October is coming, and with that, our one year anniversary (party details coming soon).   As many of you know, we are expanding, and working towards our mission of having a space where you can make anything, big or small.   Lately, in addition to all of this, we’ve been giving some attention to a few of our local artists and helping them make some awesome things.   

SuttonBeresCuller have been working in open studio at the Henry Art Museum and building Panoptos, an art installation (giant robot) that will be unveiled and publicly interactive on October 1st for the Henry’s Fall Open House. We have been quietly helping, and even got a chance to get out of the basement (and into the Henry’s) for some robot troubleshooting, it’s only a few frames in their super cool build video, but it was a blast to be a part of their awesome project.   We have heard the Henry Open Houses are a really good time, so we won’t be offended if you spend your Friday night playing with their robots instead of ours.  

Henry Art Gallery Installation from SuttonBeresCuller on Vimeo.

Another super exciting development is that Meghan Trainor, a DXArts doctoral student, instructor and super busy visual artist, has accepted our offer to be the first official artist-in-residence at Metrix Create:Space.

   What this means is that in addition to our normal chaos, there will be bona-fide art insanity as Meghan goes through our toolboxes, gets deep with the machines and installs a unique creation in our space that could only have been made in our space.  

.

This weekend’s Makerbot Madness was amazing.  We not only had the usual flood of Makerbots, but we took a look at two new Mendels in progress.    At one point, we had 8 3D printers in the shop, which I think is a new record.   First up is the Open3DP Mendel.   It was born from a commercial FDM printer, and the build quality is excellent.    It should be running smoothly for next weekend’s Discovery Days Open House at the UW.    I highly recommend going to this event.   It’s running the TechZone reprap electronics and a Wade’s Stepper Extruder.   We spent a bit of time debugging the electronics, and although we didn’t have it printing by the end of the night, it’s definitely on track to be replicating soon. Second is Sharon Morrison’s Wood Mendel.  She has been building this repstrap with a scroll saw and a drill press.  She’s gotten pretty far in the past couple of weeks, and I’m going to guess it will be printing soon.   Sharon has been coming on Saturdays for a while now, and tested the 3D printing waters by designing and printing an awesome banana slug for Thingiverse.  You may also notice a new addition to the shop.    Jon Chandler dropped off an awesome servo clock, which conveniently covers our hours of operation.   If you hang out until midnight, you can watch it snap back to 0 right before we lock up.  Don’t look away though, it happens fast.

This weekend’s Makerbot Madness was amazing.  We not only had the usual flood of Makerbots, but we took a look at two new Mendels in progress.    At one point, we had 8 3D printers in the shop, which I think is a new record.  

UW stratasys printed mendelFirst up is the Open3DP Mendel.   It was born from a commercial FDM printer, and the build quality is excellent.    It should be running smoothly for next weekend’s Discovery Days Open House at the UW.    I highly recommend going to this event.  

It’s running the TechZone reprap electronics and a Wade’s Stepper Extruder.   We spent a bit of time debugging the electronics, and although we didn’t have it printing by the end of the night, it’s definitely on track to be replicating soon.

wood mendelSecond is Sharon Morrison’s Wood Mendel.  She has been building this repstrap with a scroll saw and a drill press.  She’s gotten pretty far in the past couple of weeks, and I’m going to guess it will be printing soon.  

Sharon has been coming on Saturdays for a while now, and tested the 3D printing waters by designing and printing an awesome banana slug for Thingiverse. 

servo clockYou may also notice a new addition to the shop.    Jon Chandler dropped off an awesome servo clock, which conveniently covers our hours of operation.   If you hang out until midnight, you can watch it snap back to 0 right before we lock up.  Don’t look away though, it happens fast.

If you’ve been around the shop lately, you’ve probably heard us mention that we’re going to build Johnathan Wards’ MTM PCB Mill.   We’ve been making good progress. We don’t have a shopbot, and our first attempt at getting some parts made on a neighbor’s CNC didn’t work out, so we lasercut our assembly out of 6mm plywood and did a bit of glue work to get a nice solid frame.  This not only looks nice, it gives us a lot more control over how we can build the thing.  Turns out the first failure was a good thing because other than the initial body,  our mill isn’t going to be very much like the original at all.   Which is of course the point of Open Source Hardware.   It’s not really a blueprint, it’s a starting point. We’ve been really interested in is seeing if we could build the mill without going through the MTM BOM.   Sure, it’s reasonable pricing if you’re looking at CNC mills, but buying 108 bucks worth of Frelon lined linear bearings when we already have a bunch of tools that make tools seems silly. We can make linear bearings. We have a makerbot and a spool of HDPE (slippery plastic for the uninitiated).  Add to that we have printer rods in the Junk Box, extra threaded rod from our second makerbot build, stepper motors, drivers, arduinos, DC motors, and pounds upon pounds of screws and nuts.  We started looking around the shop and figured out we can make this thing with stuff we have laying around.  Once it’s built, we can use it to make itself better too! Tonight was all about hacksaws and printing with HDPE for the first time.  It was a bit of effort, but we got all our rods cut and built an X axis that slides pretty smooth. We also got some ideas for the next round of cuts, which we should be able to fit in the scrap from the first round.   We’ll keep you updated on our progress, and publish our plans so you can make what we do, and change what you want. Once it’s done, we’re going to put this robot to work.  Come in and make surface mount PCBs in a little under an hour. If you’re wondering how to make boards (we sure are), we’ve started up a wiki page on the toolchain that the Center for Bits and Atoms uses.   It’s pretty cool stuff.

If you’ve been around the shop lately, you’ve probably heard us mention that we’re going to build Johnathan Wards’ MTM PCB Mill.   We’ve been making good progress.

frame

We don’t have a shopbot, and our first attempt at getting some parts made on a neighbor’s CNC didn’t work out, so we lasercut our assembly out of 6mm plywood and did a bit of glue work to get a nice solid frame.  This not only looks nice, it gives us a lot more control over how we can build the thing.  Turns out the first failure was a good thing because other than the initial body,  our mill isn’t going to be very much like the original at all.   Which is of course the point of Open Source Hardware.   It’s not really a blueprint, it’s a starting point.

makerbotting bearingsWe’ve been really interested in is seeing if we could build the mill without going through the MTM BOM.   Sure, it’s reasonable pricing if you’re looking at CNC mills, but buying 108 bucks worth of Frelon lined linear bearings when we already have a bunch of tools that make tools seems silly. We can make linear bearings. We have a makerbot and a spool of HDPE (slippery plastic for the uninitiated).  Add to that we have printer rods in the Junk Box, extra threaded rod from our second makerbot build, stepper motors, drivers, arduinos, DC motors, and pounds upon pounds of screws and nuts.  We started looking around the shop and figured out we can make this thing with stuff we have laying around.  Once it’s built, we can use it to make itself better too!

Tonight was all about hacksaws and printing with HDPE for the first time.  It was a bit of effort, but we got all our rods cut and built an X axis that slides pretty smooth. We also got some ideas for the next round of cuts, which we should be able to fit in the scrap from the first round.   We’ll keep you updated on our progress, and publish our plans so you can make what we do, and change what you want.

Once it’s done, we’re going to put this robot to work.  Come in and make surface mount PCBs in a little under an hour.

If you’re wondering how to make boards (we sure are), we’ve started up a wiki page on the toolchain that the Center for Bits and Atoms uses.   It’s pretty cool stuff.

Tomorrow is The Blitz Capitol Hill Art Walk, and we’ve got two great artists presenting. Jessie Heaven Lotz, who’s photographs you may have seen hanging over the past month, and Amy Johnston, with her teeny tiny army of robot jewelry. More information is up on the wiki. Maps and fliers of the entire artwalk are available at Blitz.

Tomorrow is The Blitz Capitol Hill Art Walk, and we’ve got two great artists presenting. Jessie Heaven Lotz, who’s photographs you may have seen hanging over the past month, and Amy Johnston, with her teeny tiny army of robot jewelry.

More information is up on the wiki. Maps and fliers of the entire artwalk are available at Blitz.